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Could Your Hand Pain Signify a Spine Disorder?

Everyone has probably experienced pain in his or her hand, whether it’s just from a bump or perhaps overuse. However, if hand pain persists or is accompanied by tingling, numbness, or weakness that interferes with important daily tasks, such as gripping items or typing on a keyboard, then an underlying medical condition might exist.

There are many causes of hand pain and numbness, including wrist problems such as carpal tunnel syndrome, or systemic diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis. What many people don’t know, however, is that hand pain and numbness can often originate from a problem in the neck and spine.

When a nerve root in the cervical spine becomes compressed or irritated by a problem in the neck, symptoms can appear anywhere from the shoulder all the way down into the arm, hand, and fingers. Pain that travels along this nerve pathway, the radicular nerve, is called a cervical radiculopathy.

The most common conditions that can trigger radiculopathy include:

  •       Cervical herniated disc
  •       Cervical spinal stenosis
  •       Cervical degenerative disc disease
  •        Cervical osteoarthritis

The pain experienced from cervical radiculopathy can range from mildly achy to sharp and stabbing. It can also cause numbness and/or pins-and-needles tingling sensations. Symptoms can affect different sections of the hand, depending on what area of the spine the source of the irritated nerve is signaling from.

If hand pain and/or function don’t improve on their own, then a doctor should be consulted. Many conditions are more easily treated early in the process. If a nerve is compressed, then it’s especially important to get treatment before permanent damage can happen.

Everybody is different and unique in the way they experience or explain their pain, so a consultation is important when diagnosing the problem and coming up with the right treatment plan. If you’re experiencing persistent pain in your hand – especially if it travels down your arm – contact Colorado Center of Orthopaedic Excellence at (719) 623-1050 to request an appointment.

Sports Medicine: Keeping You in the Game

People with active lifestyles are often at increased risk for sports-related injuries. Our board-certified orthopedic surgeons and sports medicine specialists can properly diagnose all athletic injuries and provide treatments that restore a more pain-free condition. The Sports Medicine “team” is made up of individuals from a variety of fields such as orthopedic surgery, primary care medicine, athletic training, physical therapy, and nutrition.

Sports medicine doctors have special training to restore function to injured patients so they can get moving again as soon as possible. They are also knowledgeable about preventing illness and injury in active people. Although sports medicine doctors do work with professional athletes, they also treat children and teens involved in sports, and adults who exercise for personal fitness, as well as people who have physically demanding jobs.

Reasons to see a sports medicine specialist:

  • Ankle sprains
  • Fractures
  • Knee and shoulder injuries
  • Tendonitis
  • Exercise-induced asthma
  • Heat illness
  • Concussions
  • Eating disorders
  • Cartilage injuries
  • Proper injury recovery
In addition, sports medicine doctors can provide advice on nutrition, supplements, exercise and strength training, and injury prevention.

Our experts at the Colorado Center of Orthopaedic Excellence strive to prevent and treat injuries in physically active individuals. If your child sustains an injury during exercise, sports participation, or any type of physical activity, you may be advised to see a sports medicine doctor for treatment.

Our goal is to return you to play as quickly as possible while preventing re-injury and improving your body’s response to stress. We utilize cutting-edge diagnostic and treatment methods to eliminate pain and improve range of motion, so the next time you throw the ball, dunk a basket, or run toward the finish line, you will feel just as good or better than you did before your injury occurred.

Whether you are an amateur or professional athlete, our Colorado Springs orthopedic doctors give the best care possible. Request an appointment today with one of our specialists today by calling (719) 623-1050 or you can request one online.

Common Causes for Knee Pain

Many people think knee pain only affects older people, but it can affect people of all ages. Whether it’s due to arthritis or an injury, it is important to know what has caused the knee pain. Severe knee pain can lead to inflammation and mobility problems. Anyone suffering from knee pain should uncover the exact cause by seeking proper medical care, so that it can be treated properly. To understand the common causes of severe knee pain, it helps to know a little about how the knee works.

The knee is the joint between the bones of the upper leg and the bones of the lower leg. It allows the leg to bend and provides stability to support the weight of the body. The knee supports motions such as walking, running, crouching, jumping, and turning. Several parts help the knee to do its job, including bones, cartilage, muscles, ligaments, and tendons. Any of these parts are susceptible to disease and injury, which can lead to severe knee pain.

What are the most common causes of severe knee pain?

The common causes of severe knee pain can often be broken down into five categories: injury, infection, metabolic, degenerative, and connective tissue disorders. Here are five of the most common causes:

  1. Injury: Probably one of the most common places to become injured is around the knee. With so many muscles, tendons, and ligaments, the knee is quite susceptible to injury. There are many sports- and even work-related knee injuries that can occur, leading to severe knee pain. Most often, the pain will come from damage to the meniscus.
  2. Degenerative Joint disease: Osteoarthritis is a common cause of knee pain, although usually to older adults more than anybody else. The articular cartilage that cushions the ends of the bones in the knee eventually wears down, which can lead to severe pain from bone on bone friction and increased inflammation.
  3. Connective tissue disorders: Connective tissue is mainly considered cartilage and fat in the body, however there are over 200 connective tissue disorders that can affect a person. Common examples could be systemic lupus or autoimmune disorders such as rheumatoid arthritis.
  4. Metabolic problems: One of the most prominent metabolic disorders to associate with knee pain is osteoporosis. This is often the result of the body not being able to process certain essential vitamins and minerals correctly, most notably calcium and vitamin D.
  5. Infection: It is possible to have a bacteria infection inside the knee, causing the joint tremendous pain. This is commonly known as septic arthritis, and it is a treatable condition.

If you have been experiencing severe knee pain or another orthopedic problem, call Colorado Center of Orthopaedic Excellence at (719) 623-1050, or request an appointment online. Remember, while these are some examples of what causes knee pain, you won’t know for sure until you get an honest diagnosis from a board-certified orthopedic specialist.

Could Your Sports Career Lead to Knee Pain?

The knee is made up of bones, cartilage, muscles, ligaments, and tendons, all working as one. The knee sits in the middle of three bones: the tibia (your shinbone), the femur (your thighbone), and the patella (the kneecap). The patella is a flat, round bone that protects the knee joint. Your knees provide stability and allow your legs to bend, swivel, and straighten. Due to their intricacies, the hip and knee joints are the least stable in the body, susceptible to accelerated aging, deterioration, strain, and repetitive injuries. If the knee becomes injured, it can be due to many different things, but your sports career is a common one. Some sports may take more of a toll on the knees than others, such as distance running and basketball, while others tend to present more opportunities for impact, such as football or soccer.

If you are an athlete, and have ever sat on the sidelines with a knee injury, you probably appreciate more than ever, about how your knees have powered you through various sports and activities: kicking, jumping, running, and pivoting. Sport injuries can affect almost any part of the body, including the muscles, bones, joints and connective tissues (tendons and ligaments).

Although a knee problem is often caused by an injury to one or more of these structures, it may have another cause. Some people are more likely to develop knee problems than others. In other words, all those working parts mean there are bunches of ways to injure a knee. Many jobs, sports and recreation activities, getting older, or having a disease such as osteoporosis or arthritis increase your chances of having problems with your knees.  Common causes for injuries are overuse from repetitive motions, sudden stops or twists, or direct blows to the knee. To avoid knee injuries, it helps to understand how your knees work and what you can do to protect them.

Common knee injuries due to sports:

  • Sprains and Strains
  • Tendonitis
  • Meniscus Tears (ACL, MCL)
  • Fractures and Dislocations

When overuse damage, orthopedic trauma, or sports injuries occur, it can be devastating to your game, your workouts, your physical health, and your mental health. That is why the sports medicine specialists at Colorado Center of Orthopaedic Excellence work just as hard as you play your game to ensure you receive an accurate diagnosis and world-class care. Our goal is to return you to play as quickly as possible, while preventing re-injury and improving your body’s response to stress. 

Whether you are an amateur or professional athlete who is experiencing knee pain, our sports medicine specialists at Colorado Center of Orthopaedic Excellence can help. Call our office at (719) 623-1050 to request an appointment, or you can request one online.

Is Kinesiology Tape Effective for Knee Pain?

Kinesiology is the study and science of human movement. It is a means of prevention, management, and performance. It’s well-known that exercise and physical activity are key to a healthy life. Kinesiologists are experts in exercise and the body’s motion, with the goal of educating and helping people move better, live longer and be healthier.

These scientists are not only committed to enhancing quality of life through the promotion of physical activity, but also the prevention and management of injury, and the overall improvement of health and performance, including musculoskeletal disorders. Kinesiologists are also responsible for lowering the risk of developing chronic diseases. The science of kinesiology’s main goal is to build strong bones, joints and bodies. However, some people, depending on age, have limited mobility and are prone to injuries, especially of the knees.

Your knee happens to be the largest joint in the body. You count on your knees to provide stability and allow your legs to bend, swivel, and straighten. Since the knee is made up of bones, cartilage, muscles, ligaments, and tendons, knee injuries can become complicated since they could be caused by stress or damage to any of these parts. No matter what your age, you have likely experienced some sort of knee pain. Whether you are an athlete who experiences occasional soreness, or you live with chronic pain like arthritis, it is very important to know how your body works, and what you’re able to do. What is also very important is to know how to avoid or reduce the risk of knee injuries.

Kinesiology Tape and its Effect on Knee Pain:

Watch almost any modern sporting event, from a nationally televised game to a local 5k, and chances are you will encounter one thing in common: athletes wearing kinesiology tape. In the past few years, kinesiology taping has exploded in the world of athletics. A recent study has found that kinesiology tape can improve pain for people suffering from osteoarthritis, as well as improve joint mobility and decrease pain.

What is Kinesiology Tape?

Kinesiology tape is a thin, stretchy, elastic tape with an acrylic adhesive tape that is applied directly to the skin. Kinesiology tape is almost identical to human skin in both thickness and elasticity, which allows the taped area to move without restriction, while also providing support to muscles and joints.

Many people associate the use of kinesiology tape with sports and active lifestyles, yet there is growing evidence that it can be helpful in painful conditions that restrict people’s everyday function. Therapeutic kinesiology tape can benefit those people with a wide variety of musculoskeletal or sports injuries, plus inflammatory conditions. While kinesiology tape is most often used for musculoskeletal conditions (issues arising from muscles and joints), it’s also used for reducing inflammation, improving circulation, and promoting lymphatic drainage. “Taping” has become a widely-accepted form of therapy in the athletic population, but its potential to help many more people is just beginning to be tapped into.

Osteoarthritis and Taping: Osteoarthritis, or degenerative joint disease (DJD), is a painful condition that plagues much of the older adult population. Lost cartilage and loosened ligaments result in abnormal wear on the joints that can be extreme enough to limit the ability to function in normal daily activities. Arthritis can occur in any joint, but mostly affects knees, hips, hands, feet, and the spine. Studies have shown kinesiology tape to be effective in reducing knee pain and improving the ability to perform activities, such as climbing the stairs. Research also suggests that kinesiology taping offers promise for those suffering from arthritis in other joints besides the knee.

Post-surgical healing and Taping: Major joint replacement surgery is common today, and often these are the same joints susceptible to arthritis (knees, hips, shoulders, etc.). Afterward, reducing pain, controlling swelling, and improving mobility become primary concerns in the healing process. Taping has been shown to reduce post-operative pain, swelling, and to improve knee mobility in patients with total knee replacements.

If you would like to learn more information about kinesiology tape, call the bone and joint experts at Colorado Center of Orthopaedic Excellence at (719) 623-1050, or request an appointment online.

What Does a Hurt Shoulder mean?

The shoulder is an elegant piece of machinery. It happens to have the greatest range of motion of any joint in the body. However, this large range of motion can cause the shoulder to become unstable, leading to joint problems and the site of multiple injuries. Your shoulder joint is composed of four joints, over 30 muscles and 6 major ligaments, and three bones: the clavicle (collarbone), the scapula (shoulder blade), and the humerus (upper arm bone).  An edge of the scapula, called the acromion, forms the top of the shoulder.

Understanding how the different layers of the shoulder are built and connected can help someone understand how the shoulder works, how it can become injured, and how challenging recovery can be when injuries occur. As you can see, the shoulder is extremely complex. When you realize all the different ways and positions we use our hands and shoulders every day, it is easy to understand how they are highly vulnerable to injury and how hard daily life can be when the shoulder isn’t working well.

The most common type of shoulder injuries involves chronic shoulder pain, rotator cuff tears, total shoulder replacement, and shoulder impingement syndrome. Most problems in the shoulder involve the muscles, ligaments, and tendons, rather than the bones. Arthritis, injury, and repetitive motions such as those used during sports or work-related activities are leading causes of shoulder or elbow pain, stiffness, and restriction of movement.

However shoulder trouble happens, you should take it seriously. According to the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, too many people try to “play through the pain,” often turning a minor annoyance into a serious injury. If your shoulder feels stiff and you can’t move your arm normally, or if your shoulder feels weak or ready to pop out of its joint, schedule an appointment with your doctor or an orthopedic specialist. If the pain is intense or you cannot move your arm at all, call your doctor right away.

Here’s a rundown of the most common types of shoulder injuries:

Dislocated shoulder:

When the head of your upper-arm bone (the humerus) slips partially or completely out of the shoulder joint, you have a dislocated shoulder. This injury can happen any number of ways, from pitching a baseball to falling and landing hard on your shoulder. In any case, the injury is impossible to ignore. Your arm will feel like it’s hanging loose, and the pain will be intense. Dislocations call for immediate medical help. A doctor or other medical professional can push the arm bone back into the shoulder joint, providing dramatic and immediate pain relief. It’s not a good idea to try and pop it back in yourself, as you could easily injure yourself further.

Your shoulder problems aren’t over just because your arm is back in place. You may have to wear a sling for several weeks to rest and protect the joint. You may also have to ice the shoulder three or four times a day to reduce pain and swelling. After the swelling goes down, you can start daily exercises to strengthen your shoulder and reduce the risk of further injuries.

Separated shoulder:

A separated shoulder isn’t the same as a dislocated shoulder, but it can be just as painful. If you have a separated shoulder, the ligaments connecting your shoulder blade to your collarbone have become either strained or torn. Your shoulder will feel loose, and your arm may feel weak or even numb. The pain in your shoulder can be intense, especially if the ligaments are torn. If you only have a mild strain, you may feel moderate pain when you throw a ball or lift your arm.

Injured rotator cuff:

The “rotator cuff” is the collective name for a group of muscles and tendons that connect your upper arm bone to your shoulder blade. The rotator cuff is a vital part of the shoulder. It’s also prone to injury. If you injure or overwork your shoulder by repeatedly throwing a ball or lifting heavy objects, the tendons in the rotator cuff can become inflamed, a condition called tendinitis. In more extreme cases, the tendons and muscles in the rotator cuff can actually tear.

Injury Prevention and treatment:

To avoid injuries to the shoulder, start weightlifting sessions with a brief cardiovascular warm-up, to loosen muscles and joints. Make sure to stretch the upper body after lifting weights to prevent tight muscles and ligaments that are vulnerable to tears and sprains.

You can also prevent future injuries with weight training to strengthen the muscles that connect to your shoulders. Dips and push-ups are good ways to strengthen the whole shoulder girdle. Even abdominal exercises can help to prevent shoulder injuries. Whether you’re pitching a baseball or reaching into a closet, a strong abdominal core supports the torso, providing more overall control.

If your injury is mild or severe, your doctor will recommend daily exercises to start once you’ve recovered. These will help to strengthen your shoulder and prevent future problems.

To find out what is causing your shoulder pain, call Colorado Center of Orthopaedic Excellence at (719) 623-1050 to request an appointment.

The Difference Between Physical Therapy and Occupational Therapy

Words that sound the same may be very confusing, especially if the words are medical in nature. Medical terminology can be a very overwhelming language to learn, even to some medical professionals! This is especially true once you see how closely spelled, and in some cases, pronounced, some terms are. It is imperative that close attention is paid when using medical terminology in order to be sure that the desired information is communicated. Let’s spend a little time making sure we understand the differences between some commonly confused medical word roots. With few exceptions, we will use various suffixes, as we explore these root words to help distinguish the meanings easier.

Physical Therapy vs. Occupational Therapy

Even though they may seem alike, there is a difference between physical therapy and occupational therapy. Physical therapy aims to reduce pain, improve and restore mobility and function, and prevent disability. Occupational therapy aims to help individuals across the lifespan engage in occupations, or everyday activities, that individuals want and need to do.

Physical Therapy:

The main goal of physical therapy is to restore your function and mobility, and eliminate or minimize your pain so you can get back to your active lifestyle. People everywhere are experiencing the transformative effect physical therapy can have on their daily lives. In fact, physical therapists are experts in the way the body moves, and they help people of all ages and abilities reduce pain, improve or restore mobility, and stay active and fit throughout life.

Physical therapy can help treat the underlying source of your pain, whether it’s arthritis or another condition, and will help chronic pain improve over time. Physical therapy may include water therapy, such as working muscles in a pool or whirlpool. Physical therapy also includes regular exercise, and working with pain specialists trained in physical therapy can teach you the right way to exercise to alleviate pain, not increase it.

Occupational Therapy:

Occupational therapists must often determine whether the patient can complete daily functions on their own, or whether a caregiver is ultimately needed. They focus on the patient’s well-being, both in and outside of therapy.

Occupational therapy is the only profession that helps people across the lifespan to do the things they want and need to do through the therapeutic use of daily activities or occupations. Occupational therapy practitioners enable people of all ages to live life to its fullest by helping them promote health, and prevent or live better with their injury, illness, or disability.  Common occupational therapy interventions include helping children with disabilities to participate fully in school and social situations, as well as helping people recovering from injury to regain skills.  

To learn more about the difference between physical therapy and occupational therapy, call Colorado Center of Orthopaedic Excellence at (719) 623-1050 to request an appointment. 

Physical Therapy Can Eliminate the Need for Medication

Have you ever suffered from such bad and long lasting pain that you just reach for your medicine cabinet and take whatever will relieve your pain the fastest? Truth is, that pain medications such as Tylenol and Aleve usually only offer temporary pain relief, meaning, it is not going to stop the pain or cure what’s causing it. Fortunately, there are many alternative approaches available through pain management specialists who can provide you with better pain management strategies. When it comes to pain management, medication isn’t the only solution.

In many cases, physical therapy has been shown to be as effective as surgery in treating a wide range of conditions, from rotator cuff tears to degenerative disk disease and knee osteoarthritis. Physical therapists are evidence-based health care professionals who offer cost-effective treatment that can improve mobility and relieve pain. They will try to reduce the need for surgery and prescription drugs, and allow patients to participate in a recovery plan designed for their specific needs.

Avoid Surgery and Prescription Drugs

While surgery and prescription drugs can be the best course of treatment for certain diagnoses, there is increasing evidence demonstrating that conservative treatments like physical therapy can be equally effective and much less expensive. Prescription pain medication will often only mask the pain, and can have unfortunate side effects such as constipation, and the potential for addiction. In some cases, surgery may be the only way to fix the injury, but the best protocol is often to try a non-invasive approach first. The one thing that surgery cannot do is strengthen your muscles and increase flexibility, and physical therapy is often prescribed after many orthopedic surgeries.

Most importantly, unlike medication, physical therapy can help treat the underlying source of your pain, whether it’s arthritis or another condition, and will help to reduce chronic pain over time. Physical therapy may include stretching, aerobic exercise, yoga and pilates, and even water therapy – such as working muscles in a pool or whirlpool to reduce impact and stress. Physical therapy also includes regular exercise, and working with our trained physical therapists will teach you the right way to exercise to alleviate and avoid pain, rather than increasing it.

Benefits of physical therapy:

The main goal of physical therapy is to restore your function and mobility, and eliminate or minimize your pain so you can get back to your active lifestyle. People everywhere are experiencing the transformative effect physical therapy can have on their daily lives. In fact, they are experts in the way the body moves, and they help people of all ages and abilities reduce pain, improve or restore mobility, and stay active and fit throughout life.

A customized physical therapy program can help individuals return to their prior level of functioning, and encourage activities and lifestyle changes that can help prevent further injury and improve overall health and well-being. Primary care doctors often refer patients for physical therapy at the first sign of a problem, since it is considered a traditional approach to managing problems.

If you are experiencing chronic pain or reduced mobility and would like to learn more about the benefits of physical therapy, call Colorado Center of Orthopaedic Excellence at (719) 623-1050 to request an appointment.

Physical Therapy Myths Debunked

The main goal of physical therapy is to restore your function and mobility, and eliminate or minimize your pain so you can get back to your active lifestyle. People everywhere are experiencing the transformative effect physical therapy can have on their daily lives. In fact, as experts in the way the body moves, physical therapists help people of all ages and abilities reduce their pain, improve or restore mobility, and stay active and fit throughout life.

A customized physical therapy program can help individuals return to their prior level of functioning, and encourage activities and lifestyle changes that can help prevent further injury and improve overall health and well-being. Primary care doctors often refer patients for physical therapy at the first sign of a problem, since it is considered a traditional approach to managing problems.

Physical therapists are healthcare professionals who offer cost-effective treatment to improve mobility and relieve pain, reduce the need for surgery and prescription drugs, allowing patients to participate in a recovery plan designed for their specific needs. However, often people tend to want to believe a myth, advice that is simply untrue. Here are 7 myths where believing them can be detrimental to your health if not dispelled.

1. Myth: I need a referral to see a physical therapist.

A recent survey by the American Physical Therapy Association (APTA) revealed 70% of people think a referral or prescription is required for evaluation by a physical therapist. However, all 50 states and the District of Columbia (DC) allow patients to be evaluated by a physical therapist without a physician’s prior referral. Some states have restrictions about the treatment a physical therapist can provide without a physician referral.

2. Myth: Physical therapy is painful.

Physical therapists seek to minimize your pain and discomfort, including chronic or long-term pain. They work within your pain threshold to help you heal, and restore movement and function. Physical therapy can be somewhat painful depending on the type of injury, but it relieves pain.

3. Myth: Physical therapy is only for injuries and accidents.

Physical therapists do a lot more than just stretch or strengthen weak muscles after an injury or surgery. They are skilled at knowing the functional movement and limitations of the musculoskeletal system. They evaluate and diagnose potential problems before they lead to more serious injuries or disabling conditions, from carpal tunnel syndrome and frozen shoulder, to chronic headaches and lower back pain.

4. Myth: Any health care professional can perform physical therapy.

Although people know that physical therapy can only be performed by a licensed physical therapist, many people still believe other health care professionals can also administer physical therapy. Many physical therapists also pursue board certification in specific areas such as neurology and orthopedics.

5. Myth: Physical therapy isn’t covered by insurance.

Most insurance policies cover some form of physical therapy. Beyond insurance coverage, physical therapy has proven to reduce costs by helping people avoid unnecessary imaging scans, surgery, or prescription drugs. Physical therapy can also lower costs by helping patients avoid falls or by addressing conditions before they become chronic.

6. Myth: Surgery is my only option.

In many cases, physical therapy has been shown to be as effective as surgery in treating a wide range of conditions, from rotator cuff tears, degenerative disk diseases to knee osteoarthritis. Those who have recently seen a physical therapist know this to be true, as physical therapy can provide an alternative to surgery.

7. Myth: I can do physical therapy myself.

Your participation is key to a successful treatment plan, but every patient still needs the expert care and guidance of a licensed physical therapist. Your therapist will leverage his or her specialized education, clinical expertise, and the latest available evidence to evaluate your needs and make a diagnosis before creating an individualized plan of care.

If you would like to learn more about the availability and benefits of physical therapy to treat existing pain or for recovery from injury, call Colorado Center of Orthopaedic Excellence today, at (719) 623-1050. We look forward to helping you get the best possible treatment for an optimal lifestyle.

Podiatrist vs. Foot and Ankle Doctor

The human foot & ankle is a strong and complex mechanical structure that contain 26 bones, 33 joints, and more than 100 muscles, tendons & ligaments. The foot and ankle is one of the more complex areas of the human skeletal system, and obtaining expertise in this region of the body requires years of training, education, and practice. It is important to know the difference between a podiatrist and an orthopedic surgeon who specializes in foot and ankle, if you are seeking care for a foot and ankle problem.

What is the difference between a podiatrist and a foot and ankle orthopedic doctor?

One of the most significant differences between the two professions is the level of training each completes. As a medical doctor, an orthopedic surgeon who specializes in the foot and ankle has a better understanding of the entire body – including bones, muscles, ligaments, tendons, and joints – as well as medical conditions that may affect your overall health. Through this training, an orthopedic surgeon intimately understands the impact that the entire body can have on a foot and ankle condition.

Podiatrists provide a wide range of medical care, by evaluating, diagnosing, and treating common conditions and injuries affecting the foot, ankle and lower leg. Depending on their credentials, such as certifications, state licensure, or hospital affiliation, podiatrists can perform surgery on the bones, ligaments, tendons and joints of the foot and ankle. Podiatrists treat many conditions related to the foot, ankle and leg, including bunions, plantar fasciitis, Morton’s neuroma, etc.

If you have any more questions regarding whether you should see a podiatrist or foot and ankle doctor, call Colorado Center of Orthopaedic Excellence to request an appointment.