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Could You Be Experiencing Patellofemoral Knee Pain?

The knee is made up of bones, cartilage, muscles, ligaments, and tendons, all working as one. What makes knee injuries complicated is they could be caused by stress or damage to any of these parts. The knee sits in the middle of three bones: the tibia (your shinbone), the femur (your thighbone), and the patella (the kneecap). The patella is a flat and round bone that protects the knee joint.

What is the patella, and what causes patellofemoral pain?

The patella is a small bone located in front of the knee joint, where the thighbone (femur) and shinbone (tibia) meet. It protects the knee and connects the muscles in the front of the thigh to the tibia. Patellofemoral pain is the medical term used when pain occurs at the front of the knee, around the kneecap (patella), without signs of any damage or other problems in the knee joint.

Knee pain affects people differently. This type of pain is due to a combination of different factors which increase the pressure between the kneecap (patella) and the lower part of the thigh bone (femur). This may happen due to overuse, during a fall, running, cycling, squatting and going up and down stairs.

The most common symptoms of a patellar fracture are pain and swelling in the front of the knee. Other symptoms may include:

  • Bruising
  • Inability to straighten the knee or keep it extended in a straight leg raise
  • Inability to walk

Unfortunately, injury can cause the patella to fracture. A patellar fracture is a break in the kneecap, and it is often very painful. Since the patella acts as a shield for your knee joint, it is vulnerable to fracture if you fall directly onto your knee; or even hit it against the dashboard in a vehicle collision. A patellar fracture is a serious injury that can make it difficult or even impossible to straighten your knee or walk.

Treatment:

  •         Physiotherapy
  •        Pain Killers (Anti-Inflammatory Meds or Tylenol)
  •        Limited movement
  •         Taping of the patella

Some simple patellar fractures can be treated by wearing a cast or splint until the bone heals. In most patellar fractures, however, the pieces of bone move out of place when the injury occurs. For these more complicated fractures, surgery is needed to restore and stabilize the kneecap, to remove bone fragments, and allow for the return of function.

To learn more about what to do for your patella pain, call Colorado Center for Orthopaedic Excellence at (719) 623-1050 or request an appointment online.

Tips to Help You Bounce Back from Knee Pain

If you ever had any sort of injury, especially a knee injury, you probably appreciate how your knees power you through various sports and activities: kicking, jumping, running, and pivoting. To avoid knee injuries, it helps to understand how your knees work and what you can do to protect them.

When it comes to dealing with any type of injury, the knee is often one of the biggest problem areas of the body. The first thing to understand about knee health is that the knee is a stable joint that functions and exists directly between two very mobile joint the hip and the ankle. If the hip or ankle are injured, mobility of the knee can become limited.

The knee is a joint, the largest joint in the body. Your knees provide stability and allow your legs to bend, swivel, and straighten. The knee is made up of bones, cartilage, muscles, ligaments, and tendons, all working as one. What makes knee injuries complicated is they could be caused by stress or damage to any of these parts. The knee sits in the middle of three bones: the tibia (your shinbone), the femur (your thighbone), and the patella (the kneecap). The patella is a flat and round bone that protects the knee joint.

No matter what your age, you have likely experienced some sort of knee pain. Whether you are an athlete who experiences occasional soreness, or you live with chronic pain from a condition like arthritis, there are solutions to fit your needs. Here are some tips to help you bounce back from your knee pain.

  •  Tip #1: Relieve the pain in some way, and remember the RICE method:

R- Rest and reduce your activity

I- Ice joints that feel swollen, tender, or achy. Use ice for no more than 20 minutes at a time

C- Compress the injured area with a bandage or brace to keep swelling down and provide support.

E- Elevate injured areas above the heart, if possible, to reduce swelling.

  • Tip #2: Properly warm up and stretch before and after activities or sports
  • Tip #3: Maintain a healthy weight through proper diet and exercise
  • Tip #4: Participate in regular activity at least three times per week
  • Tip #5: Wear comfortable shoes with good support, or consider orthotic inserts
  • Tip #6: Use the correct techniques or positions during activities so that you do not strain your muscles

To learn about what may be causing your knee pain and how to avoid it, call Colorado Center of Orthopaedic Excellence at (719) 623-1050 to request an appointment, or request one online.

Osgood-Schlatter Disease

When it comes to dealing with any type of injury, the knee is often one of the biggest problem areas of the body. The first thing to understand about knee health is that the knee is a stable joint that functions and exists directly between two very mobile joints, the hip and the ankle. If the hip or ankle becomes injured, mobility of the knee is limited.

The knee is a joint, the largest joint in the body. Your knees provide stability and allow your legs to bend, swivel, and straighten. The knee is made up of bones, cartilage, muscles, ligaments, and tendons, all working as one. What makes knee injuries complicated is that they could be caused by stress or damage to any of these parts. The knee sits in the middle of three bones: the tibia (your shinbone), the femur (your thighbone), and the patella (the kneecap). The patella is a flat and round bone that protects the knee joint.

If you’ve ever experienced any sort of injury, especially a knee injury, you probably appreciate how your knees power you through various sports and activities: kicking, jumping, running, and pivoting. To avoid knee injuries, it helps to understand how your knees work and what you can do to protect them.

What is Osgood-Schlatter Disease?

Osgood-Schlatter disease is an overuse injury of the knee. Frequent use and physical stress cause inflammation (pain and swelling) at the point where the tendon from the kneecap (called the patella) attaches to the shinbone (tibia).

Osgood-Schlatter disease is often caused by frequent use, and often leads to inflammation or even a tiny fracture of the shinbone. The pain usually worsens with exercise, jumping, and sports such as basketball, volleyball, soccer, figure skating, and gymnastics. In some people, both knees are affected. Don’t confuse OSD with a typical orthopaedic injury, however, because it is strongly associated with the simple process of growth spurts in children. OSD usually occurs in growing children between the ages of 11-14, and may cause pain until that growth spurt has subsided.

Signs and Symptoms of OSD:

·         Pain, swelling, or tenderness below the knee

·         Pain that becomes worse during activities such as running and jumping

·         Limping after physical activity

With Osgood-Schlatter disease, these symptoms usually go away or feel better when a person rests. OSD can cause very different symptoms in different people, as it all depends on the severity of the condition. Some people may feel mild knee pain only when they play sports, while others may feel constant pain that makes playing any sport difficult.

Treatment:

Most people with Osgood-Schlatter can continue playing sports after some rest. However, if the pain is severe, the doctor might recommend taking a short break or trying activities with less jumping and running for a while. Ask your doctor about stretching and strengthening exercises that may help relieve some of the pain while keeping the area strong. These exercises focus on the quadriceps and hamstring muscles.

More severe cases require more rest (usually a total break from sports and physical activities). Active people may find this very difficult, but the knee can’t heal without rest. Some people wind up with a cast or brace to enforce the doctor’s orders. Your doctor may also recommend physical therapy for stretching and strengthening exercises.

If you think you may be suffering from Osgood-Schlatter disease call Colorado Center of Orthopaedic Excellence at (719) 623-1050 to request an appointment.

Knee Pain, What Does It Mean?

When it comes to dealing with any type of injury, the knee is often one of the biggest problem areas of the body. The first thing to understand about knee health is that the knee is a stable joint that functions and exists directly between two very mobile joint the hip and the foot. If the hip or foot is injured, mobility of the knee is limited.

If you’ve ever had any sort of injury, especially a knee injury, you may have grown to appreciate how your knees power you through various sports and activities: kicking, jumping, running, and pivoting. To avoid knee injuries, it helps to understand how your knees work and what you can do to protect them.

The knee is a joint, the largest joint in the body. Your knees provide stability and allow your legs to bend, swivel, and straighten. The knee is made up of bones, cartilage, muscles, ligaments, and tendons, all working as one. What makes knee injuries complicated is they can be caused by stress or damage to any of these parts. The knee sits in the middle of three bones: the tibia (your shinbone), the femur (your thighbone), and the patella (the kneecap). The patella is a flat and round bone that protects the knee joint.

As we age, strain on our knees becomes compounded, and the pain becomes more common and persistent. With that said, the pain can come from so many different sources, whether by aging or injury. Understanding what is causing your knee pain may be a simple task, or more complicated. A skilled physician can use clues to determine the cause of knee pain.

  • Front of Knee: Pain over the front of the knee is most commonly related to the kneecap. Kneecap pain can be caused by several different problems.
  • Inside of Knee: Pain on the inside, or medial side of the knee, is commonly caused by medial meniscus tearsMCL injuries, and arthritis.
  • Outside of Knee: Pain on the outside of the knee, or lateral side, is commonly caused by lateral meniscus tears, LCL injuries, IT band tendonitis, and arthritis.
  • Back of Knee: Pain in the back of the knee can often be due to the collection of fluid, called a Baker’s Cyst.

The knee is a complicated and critical part needed for your everyday life activities. So, when you have pain that comes with serious symptoms or lasts for more than a week or two, seek the right diagnosis by getting a physical exam and any necessary imaging that comes with it.

If you are experiencing knee pain, call Colorado Center of Orthopaedic Excellence at (719) 623-1050 to request an appointment.

Tips for Surviving Knee Pain

When it comes to dealing with any type of injury, the knee is often one of the biggest and most common problem areas in the whole body. The first thing to understand about knee health is that the knee is a stable joint that functions and exists directly between two very mobile joints – the hip and the foot. If the hip or foot is injured, mobility of the knee can become limited.

The knee is one of the largest and most used joints in the body. Your knees provide stability and allow your legs to bend, swivel, and straighten. The knee is made up of bones, cartilage, muscles, ligaments, and tendons, all working as one. What makes knee injuries complicated is that they could be caused by stress or damage to any of these parts. The knee sits in the middle of three bones: the tibia (your shinbone), the femur (your thighbone), and the patella (the kneecap). The patella is a flat and round bone that shields and protects the knee joint.

If you ever experienced any sort of injury, especially an injury to the knee, you probably appreciate how your knees power you through various sports and activities: kicking, jumping, running, and pivoting. To avoid knee injuries, it helps to understand how your knees work and what you can do to protect them. Here are some tips on how to survive knee pain:

·         Keep your knees and the muscles that support them strong and flexible. Warm up before activities. Try the following stretches:

–          Hamstring stretch

–          Knee-to-chest exercise

–          Calf stretch

–          Straight-leg raises

·         Avoid activities that stress your knees, such as deep knee bends or downhill running.

  • Wear shoes with good arch supports and cushioning.
  • Wear knee guards during sports or recreational activities, such as roller-skating or soccer.
  • Stretch before and after physical exercise, sports, or recreational activities to warm up your muscles and tendons.
  • Use the correct techniques or positions during activities so that you do not strain your muscles, ligaments and tendons.

Some of the best advice is to not overdo it, and seek proper care before pain becomes worse. You never want to continue activity on an injured knee, because the injured area and subsequent treatment can become more complex. To find out more information on how to treat a knee injury, call Colorado Center of Orthopaedic Excellence at (719) 623-1050 to request an appointment.