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Treatments for Hip Pain

As we age, hip pain becomes a common issue for many of us – and there are a wide range of causes for it. The most common cause of hip pain is arthritis, which causes the joints to become inflamed and ache.

Osteoarthritis, also often called simply “arthritis,” is considered an overuse type of arthritic injury. It can occur in athletes in joints that are overused, and it can occur in people as we get older and have been using our hips and other joints for many years. Arthritis inflammation leads to swelling, and the swelling leads to stiffness and pain. 

If you are experiencing chronic pain in one or both hips, the method of treatment for your hip pain will depend on the underlying cause of the pain. Let’s talk about what can be done to treat and minimize your hip pain, and who can best help you.

What Can I Do for My Hip Pain?

There are several things you can do and lifestyle changes you can make in order to help lessen your hip pain, including the following:

  • If you are overweight, lose weight. That would place less pressure on the hips, knees, and feet.
  • Avoid jogging or running downhill. If you are an avid jogger and come to a downhill section, the gravity of each stride plus your body weight places additional stressors on the hip joint – so it’s better to walk down the hills.
  • Avoid standing for a long time.
  • See an orthopedist for some methods to strengthen the surrounding muscles without placing pressure on the hip. The hip joint is a very deep joint and is surrounded by muscle, so strengthening those muscles will help take some pressure off the hip and bring relief.

Minimizing Impact on Your Hips

If you engage in high-impact activities, always warm up before a workout. That includes a full 15 minutes of stretching.

It is a good idea to swap jogging or tennis for more low-impact or no-impact activities, such as cycling or swimming. Activities with less impact will cause less damage to your hip.

Ensure that your shoes fit properly, and that you are wearing the correct gear. Your socks, shoes, and clothing should all fit you well and not tug while you move. Shoes and socks that are too tight can hinder proper circulation, so make sure they’re supportive and snug without making your toes immovable in them. Shoes should have enough cushioning to absorb the shock away from your hips while you walk. 

Medical Treatment for Hip Pain

Your orthopedist will diagnose the source of your hip pain and will provide the best plan to move ahead with your treatment. Ultrasound-guided injections can bring about several months with minimized pain. Physical therapy is also very helpful for many patients.

If physical therapy, pain-relief injections, and other noninvasive or minimally invasive methods do not work to lessen your hip pain, your orthopedist may discuss hip surgery with you. Minimally invasive hip replacement surgery is now available as an outpatient treatment, and this may work for you.

The medical field has made incredible strides in pain-relief treatments, and your orthopedic physician will explain your options.

Hip Doctors in Colorado Springs 

If you are in or near Colorado Springs, and you or a loved one suffers from hip pain, get it checked out by experienced orthopedic surgeons. Our team takes care of high-profile Olympians, professional and amateur athletes, as well as weekend warriors and active retirees. We will first try the most minimally invasive methods possible to help relieve your hip pain, and that may be all you need to get back to your active lifestyle.

Contact our team today at the Colorado Center of Orthopaedic Excellence by calling us at (719) 623-1050 or request an appointment online, and see some of the best orthopedic doctors in Colorado!

What is Primary Orthopedic Care?

The term “general orthopedics” is pretty self-explanatory. It is the area of medicine concerned with the bones, joints, ligaments, tendons, muscles, nerves, and connective tissue. Doctors who practice orthopedics diagnose, treat, and help prevent conditions and injuries to these body parts, also called the musculoskeletal system.

But what exactly is primary orthopedic care?

As you probably know, a primary care physician is a doctor who provides both the first contact for a patient with an undiagnosed health problem and continuing care for various conditions.

Primary orthopedic care is similar yet slightly different in that it specializes in orthopedics. It uses a symptom-based approach to common orthopedic disorders seen in a primary-care setting, with an additional emphasis on sports-related injuries.

Comprehensive Approach to Health and Well-Being

In addition to addressing specific orthopedic injuries, a primary orthopedic care physician cares for all illnesses related to the patient. This comprehensive orthopedic care approach is taken to ensure the patient’s overall health and well-being.

For example, consider the role of a primary care sports physician. He or she is an expert in his or her field. Not only are they involved in research and education regarding sports medicine, but they also have a significant amount of hands-on experience. Having received fellowship training and undergone years of clinical practice, they have the skills to provide care for athletes of all ages and levels of competitive ability. However, before a primary care sports physician could specialize in sports medicine, he or she would need training in general orthopedics. Thus, they are qualified to address a wide range of orthopedic conditions and injuries and have the skills to provide comprehensive orthopedic care as it relates to effective treatments.

That’s why you often see orthopedic surgeons as physicians to professional, college, and high school sports team. Not only do they have a broad knowledge of orthopedic conditions, but often they are or were athletes as well with personal experience as to how athletes are affected by specific injuries and illnesses. Their role is not just to treat injuries as they occur, but also to help prevent injuries and to help the team maximize the performance of its players.

It is that focus on total patient health that defines primary orthopedic care. It isn’t just about managing your pain and injury. Primary orthopedic care is also about enabling patients to stay healthy, recover quickly, and lead a more active life. To do that, a primary orthopedic care clinic is staffed with board-certified physical and occupational therapists as well as board-certified orthopedic surgeons, podiatrists, osteopathic medical doctors, and physician’s assistants.

When primary orthopedic care is needed for shoulder and elbow; hand, foot, and ankle; and hip and knee conditions in the Colorado Springs area, you can count on Colorado Center of Orthopaedic Excellence. Our orthopedic surgeons and other specialists diagnose and treat all kinds of joint conditions and sports injuries and will explore noninvasive methods first before resorting to surgery.

For expert and compassionate care in the greater Colorado Springs area, call (719) 623-1050 for an appointment today.

Podiatrist vs. Orthopedist

When you have a problem with your foot or ankle that needs medical attention, where do you go – to a podiatrist or an orthopedic surgeon? And does it make a difference?

To answer those questions, let’s first look at what each of these specialists do.

A podiatrist is a doctor of podiatric medicine (DPM), specifically a specialist whose focus is strictly on foot and ankle care. That includes treatment of such conditions as:

·       Bunions

·       Toe and hindfoot fractures

·       Diabetic ulcers and wounds

·       Plantar fasciitis (inflammation of connective tissue on the bottom of the foot)

·       Hallux rigidus (stiff big toe)

·       Flat feet

·       Gout

·       Toenail disease

·       Heel spurs

·       Athlete’s foot

·       Corns

An orthopedic surgeon is a medical doctor (MD), specifically a specialist whose focus is on the care of bones, muscles, ligaments, tendons and nerves throughout the body – including in the foot and ankle. In regard to the latter, that includes treatment of such conditions as:

·       Achilles tendon tear and repair

·       Ankle replacement and cartilage restoration

·       Bunions

·       Flat feet

·       Plantar fasciitis

·       Heel spurs

·       Morton’s neuroma (nerve inflammation near the toes)

·       Hammer toe, mallet toe, and claw toe deformities

·       Stress fractures

·       Toe fractures

·       Hindfoot fractures

·       Metatarsal (forefoot fracture)

As you can see, both podiatrists and orthopedists perform many of the same foot and ankle procedures. Both are highly trained and qualified to treat foot and ankle conditions both surgically and non-surgically. The only discernible difference between them is that an orthopedist manages parts of the foot and ankle that pertain to the bones, soft tissues and joints, while a podiatrist manages the same areas, but also the biomechanics and dermatology of the foot and ankle. For instance, a podiatrist is often an integral care provider for people with diabetes who have serious concerns about foot health.

So, who do you choose for diagnosis and treatment of your foot or ankle problem?

It often depends on your particular foot or ankle problem – and how comfortable you are with one doctor over another. But it’s a dilemma you don’t have to face at Colorado Center for Orthopaedic Excellence in Colorado Springs. That’s because our practice specializes in both podiatry and foot and ankle orthopedics.

Our board-certified podiatric surgeon Dr. Frederick Hainge is highly skilled in diagnosing and treating structural and biomechanical issues, wounds, toe and foot deformities, nerve pain, and much more.

Meanwhile, fellowship-trained Dr. John Shank and our team of orthopedic physicians help patients manage their foot and ankle conditions through reconstructive procedures, arthroscopic and open fusion surgeries, physical therapy, and other procedures. And it’s all done under one roof.

The Colorado Center for Orthopaedic Excellence in Colorado Springs regularly treats injuries to bones and joints, providing the best of care. If a foot or ankle injury or pain is cause for concern, our board-certified orthopedic surgeons will quickly diagnose and treat the condition. Call us at (719) 623-1050 today for an appointment.

The Difference Between Orthopedic Urgent Care and Regular Urgent Care

You’ve just sustained an orthopedic injury. You need medical attention, but the injury probably doesn’t warrant a trip to the emergency room. So, where do you go – to the nearest urgent care facility or an orthopedic urgent care center?

You may not think it matters much. But knowing where to receive the appropriate care following an orthopedic injury can make all the difference in the world.  That’s because there are distinct differences between a regular urgent care and orthopedic urgent care. Making the right decision can enable you to receive prompt and accurate treatment, possible diagnostic imaging, that will hopefully lead to a faster recovery. 

Orthopedic Urgent Care vs. Regular Urgent CareTypically, an urgent care center is located in a retail space and often refers its walk-in patients to another appropriate community health care provider – such as an imaging center or an orthopedic specialist – for many orthopedic injuries, from broken bones to sprained ankles.

Orthopedic urgent care centers, on the other hand, tend to be located within larger orthopedic or medical facilities in which they serve as an entrée to an orthopedic practice.  In fact, some hospitals provide ortho urgent care in addition to conventional care centers as a gateway to hospital services.

While it is true that both types of urgent care facilities treat orthopedic injuries, only orthopedic urgent care centers are designed exclusively for treating both acute and chronic musculoskeletal injuries. You are not waiting in line with or behind someone suffering from the flu or a stomach ailment, for example.

Many minor breaks and sprains can be treated at an urgent care clinic as long as the break isn’t an open fracture – where bone is protruding through the skin – or there isn’t any other deformity.

Conversely, an orthopedic urgent care offers prompt specified care for all types of orthopedic injuries. Whereas a physician at an urgent care center will patch you up and may refer you to an orthopedic specialist for continued care, a specialist at an orthopedic urgent care center will examine you, provide a diagnosis, treatment, and continued care all under one roof.

Bottom line: Orthopedic urgent care providers are specially-trained in bone, muscle, and joint injuries. They deliver same-day treatment, on-site X-rays, and should it be necessary, follow-up care with an orthopedic specialist.  An urgent care provider will refer you to an orthopedic specialist anyway, so you might as well cut out the middle man and receive seamless specialized care from the start.

The Right Choice for Orthopedic Injury

Of course, if you have a major, life-threatening musculoskeletal injury that occurs after hours, you should go to the nearest emergency room for treatment. Otherwise, you’ll receive specified care with less waiting time and cost than an emergency room visit, by heading straight to an orthopedic urgent care center.

The Colorado Center for Orthopaedic Excellence in Colorado Springs caters to both the world’s elite athletes and all those who need the best care. If you sustain an injury to your bones or joints, our board-certified orthopedic surgeons will diagnose the condition and explain your treatment options. Call us at (719) 623-1050 or request an appointment online.

Can Scoliosis Occur Later in Life?

Scoliosis is a condition where the spine curves to the left or right. It can be slight or severe, and there may or may not be a defined reason for developing the condition. Most of the time, scoliosis develops around the time of puberty. Adolescent girls get scoliosis more than boys, and children more than adults. In rare cases, scoliosis can also develop during adulthood.

Your spine has natural curves, like an S, that gently support your body and its movement. When a person has scoliosis, a sideways curvature is present. Some of the symptoms of scoliosis include pain, tingling in the extremities, and noticeable abnormalities in posture (like uneven shoulders or stooping). Nobody knows why people develop scoliosis, but there is some evidence of hereditary factors. 

There are two types of scoliosis, idiopathic and degenerative. Idiopathic scoliosis usually develops in and is diagnosed in young adolescents. Idiopathic scoliosis may not be diagnosed until adulthood, either because there may have been no symptoms for many years, or the curvature has become more pronounced.

Degenerative scoliosis is more likely to occur in adults. Just like many orthopedic conditions faced by older adults, degenerative scoliosis is preceded by wearing down of the cartilage between the bones of the spine. The spinal bones collapse against each other and can deviate to the side. Osteoarthritis of the spine results in scoliosis for some people. Some patients will also have osteoporosis also add the possible complication of a fracture due to the pressure on the spinal curvature. But just as idiopathic scoliosis may not cause any symptoms or discomfort, the same is true for degenerative scoliosis. There is no need for treatment if it is not causing the patient any issues with pain or mobility. Of course, a patient is unlikely to seek treatment and be diagnosed if there are no troubling symptoms.

Some possible reasons for the increase in cases of adult scoliosis are that people are living longer, and more active lives. Wear and tear of the cartilage in the back happens more quickly when there is more movement, such as from running, playing sports, or just walking. People also are more likely to seek out help for back pain than they may have been in the past. As the field of orthopedic medicine develops and specialists are more widely available, people increasingly know where to go with their back pain and they have more trust in orthopedic physicians who can help.

The severity of scoliosis is measured in degrees that the spine moves away from the center. If the curve is less than 40 degrees, most of the time conservative methods of treatment are effective in reducing or eliminating symptoms and preventing further curvature. Conservative treatments may include medication, physical therapy, or braces to provide stability and decrease pain. Surgical correction is a possible treatment for severe cases of scoliosis. Spinal surgery carries a significant risk of complications, so it is not normally considered unless there is severe pain or deformity. Each case is unique, so the surgery is performed with the goal of preventing further pain and damage in addition to correcting the abnormalities. 

Patients in the Colorado Springs area who have sports injuries or any orthopedic injury trust the Colorado Center for Orthopaedic Excellence to provide the best care. If you have an orthopedic injury or condition, call (719) 623-1050 for an appointment today.

What is Nursemaid Elbow Syndrome?

For a lot of children, one of their favorite games they used to play with your parents was having them hold onto both of their hands or arms, and as they’d count to three, they would lift and swing you up high up into the air over and over as if you were flying. We think of little kids as having pretty resilient bones, but this fun and warmhearted scenario doesn’t always end up favorably.

Did you know that for little children, this game can lead to an injury? But, it is not just this game, but any scenario when the arms are being held onto or yanked in general.

While many parents and caregivers may enjoy taking a child’s hands and wrists and swinging them as they walk in-between, doing so can result in injury. This common childhood injury is known as nursemaid’s elbow syndrome, or radial head subluxation (RHS).

Nursemaid’s elbow syndrome can be a very common injury to young children. When we are young, our bones and ligaments are not fully developed yet. As we develop into adults, our bones form and grow with us. In other words, our ligaments tighten and become thicker, bones enlarge and harden. Therefore, when we do get older the risk of getting injuries such as nursemaid’s elbow decreases.

However, kids are often rough and active, obviously making them prone to injuries such as sprains and broken bones, commonly to the arms. Children are also susceptible to having bones slip out of place.

Like the name implies, in many cases children are under the care of some sort of caregiver or a babysitter of some sort, like a nurse does in a hospital. When this scenario of the caregiver picking up the child the wrong way occurs, it results in nursemaid’s elbow, or pulled elbow, an accidental injury that occurs when the bones in the elbow partially pop out and dislocate. What happens is that one side of the elbow separates from the other side, and part of the ligament that wraps around the bone slips off and gets stuck between the bones.

Many parents and caregivers are unaware that swinging a child by the wrists or hands can really harm and injure their child.  It is important that parents and caregivers know the danger of swinging a child by the wrists or hands. Bones are fragile and can break when there is too much force. Even though it is an accident from having fun and playing around, if not careful, more severe complications can occur.

You should discourage anybody jerking or yanking a child’s arm. Pulling or grabbing a child by the hand or wrist can cause dislocation.  It doesn’t take much force for a child’s elbow to be pulled out of place, and it just takes a little miscalculation to cause a child a lot of pain.

Nursemaid’s elbow syndrome is painful but can be fixed with treatment. In most cases, an orthopedic doctor will gently move the bones back into normal position, by performing a procedure known as reduction. A joint reduction can be quite painful, albeit quick, and then the healing process can take place.

The doctor will hold the child’s wrist or forearm with the palm of the hand facing upwards. While putting pressure near the top of the radius bone, one of the bones in the forearm other than the ulna, the doctor will slowly bend the elbow in an attempt to pop or click the elbow joint back into place. Once the bones are put back into place, the pain and discomfort subside. If the injury is more severe, surgery may be required.

To learn more about nursemaid’s elbow syndrome, call Colorado Center of Orthopaedic Excellence in Colorado Springs at (719) 623-1050 to request an appointment with our orthopedic surgeons, or request an appointment online.

Sports Medicine: Benefits of Working Out in the Winter

Ward off those winter blues. During the winter months, colder weather brings on the winter blues. It’s not uncommon for those snowy or overcast skies to bring about some sort of stress, lack of energy, and gloom. Due to this, people have a tendency to lose motivation and start to become inactive, wanting to instead just lay inside and watch movies all day. However, doing so comes with its downfalls, such as sickness, fatigue, allergies, and seasonal depression, called SAD (seasonal affective disorder).

This tendency to be inactive during the cold winter months is a paramount problem, as days are shorter during the winter. Well, they seem shorter to the mind and body, anyways. This is due to limited sunlight (shorter daytime, longer night), leaving people little motivation to get up and do something active.

Those of us who have trouble becoming active, blame this lack of energy on the early darkness of winter, which leaves us feeling hopeless and disempowered to make a positive change. The unfortunate irony in all this, is that we find it most difficult to exercise during the winter when we actually need it most.  

So, are you tempted to hide under your covers, eat junk food, and hibernate when cold weather hits? It certainly seems like an amazing idea or a good excuse, but exercising in the cold actually has some cool advantages!

Moderate exercise gets the body to release hormones called endorphins, and endorphins make us happy. Exercise is extremely beneficial to our overall health, both mentally and physically. It provides a boost to our mood and health, helps manage stress, helps with cognitive thinking and memory, protects our immune system, and gives us energy. In other words, the benefits of exercise are limitless.

Besides the typical winter sports you might think of, such as downhill skiing or ice skating, there are plenty of healthy activities to draw you out into the winter wonderland. Going for a hike is healthy in any weather, so long as you have the proper attire and gear. Besides downhill skiing, there are activities such as cross-country skiing, and even snowshoe hiking, that are excellent activity options. 

Along with exercise, good nutrition and diet is crucial to also maintain your weight and good health. Just because it’s cold outside, doesn’t mean you need to bulk up on the carbs and fats. Stick with a balanced diet with plenty of fruits, vegetables, protein, and whole grains. And a big tip – stay hydrated during outdoor winter activities. Since it’s not as hot, people tend to think they are not perspiring, and therefore do not need as much water. You always need to stay hydrated. To motivate yourself, visualize your goal and the finish line, your body will thank you for it in the long run.

To learn more about the benefits of exercise during the wintertime, call Colorado Center of Orthopaedic Excellence in Colorado Springs at (719) 623-1050 or request an appointment online.

What is Trigger Finger?

Being able to bend your fingers is a movement so natural to everyday use, we can take it for granted. If or when your fingers or thumb catch or lock when bent, it can be a painful condition known as trigger finger.

Ordinarily, the tendons and muscles in your hand and arms bend and straighten your fingers and thumbs. The tendon itself usually glides through the tissue (or sheath) that covers it thanks to the synovium, a lubricating membrane surrounding the joint.

But if the tendon becomes inflamed and swollen, prolonged irritation of the tendon sheath will produce scarring and thickening that inevitably impedes the tendon’s motion. As a result, bending your finger or thumb can tug the inflamed tendon through a narrower sheath, which make it snap or pop.

Repeated movement or the forceful use of the finger or thumb is usually what causes trigger finger. Although it can also be caused by rheumatoid arthritis, gout, and diabetes, or by grasping something firmly for a long period of time.

That’s why industrial workers, musicians, and farm hands often suffer from trigger finger – because they repeat finger and thumb movements often. The condition is more common among women than men, and occurs most often in people who are between 40 and 60 years old.

How Do You Know You Have Trigger Finger?

One of the most obvious symptoms of trigger finger is when you experience soreness at the base of the finger or thumb. There’s also a painful clicking or snapping sound when you bend or straighten the affected finger. The catching sensation associated with trigger finger tends to get worse after you rest the finger or thumb. The finger or thumb may lock in a bent or straight position as the condition worsens and may need to be gently straightened out with your other hand.

In some cases, the finger may be swollen and there could be a bump over the joint in the palm of the hand. Also, the finger may be stiff and painful or locked in a bent position. Of course, your doctor can examine your hand and fingers and diagnose trigger finger without a lab test or X-ray.

In terms of treating trigger finger, the first step requires resting your finger or thumb. To keep the joint from moving, your doctor may put a splint on your hand.

If your symptoms persist, your doctor may address the inflammation by prescribing drugs like ibuprofen or naproxen. Another option is injecting a steroid into the tendon sheath. Or, if your trigger finger doesn’t improve, your doctor may recommend surgery.

The recovery time from trigger finger will depend on the severity of the condition and the choice of treatment.  Splinting, for example, could last up to six weeks. However, most patients recover within a few weeks provided they rest the finger or thumb and they take anti-inflammatory medication.

The Colorado Center for Orthopaedic Excellence in Colorado Springs regularly treats injuries to bones and joints, providing the best of care. If you’ve feeling pain in your hands and suspect it may be trigger finger or another condition, our board-certified orthopedic surgeons will diagnose the condition and explain your treatment options. Call us at (719) 623-1050 today for an appointment.

Recovering from Hip Dislocation

A hip dislocation is a serious and painful injury. It is usually the result of some very strong trauma, as in the case of an automobile accident or a fall. When the smooth end of the femur, or thigh bone, is pushed out of the socket formed by the pelvis, the hip joint is said to be dislocated. Emergency treatment is necessary for this injury, and a healthy recovery is vital towards returning mobility and preventing chronic pain. 

It is possible for your doctor to realign the hip joint by hand, but because of the amount of force necessary to drive the joint out of place, there is usually at least one other injury involved. 90% of hip dislocations are posterior, where the femur is pushed behind the socket of the pelvis and 10% are anterior, where the femur is pushed forward from the pelvis. 

Often, a hip dislocation is accompanied by a fracture, either to the extremities or to part of the pelvis from the force that dislodges the femur. In this case, surgery may be necessary to correct the position of the hip and repair the fractured bone at the same time. That kind of fracture sometimes occurs when the knees impact an automobile’s dashboard when there is an accident. Safety belts and airbags are meant to help protect car riders from this type of injury.

The smooth covering of cartilage on the femur is also likely to suffer some damage from a hip dislocation. Nerves and ligaments that attach the parts of the hip and make it possible for movement are damaged and torn when the hip is dislocated, too. Regaining full ability to move without pain takes time. Recovering from a hip dislocation involves rest, medication to control swelling and pain, and will often benefit from physical therapy. You may use crutches or a cane to help balance during your recovery, and there may be some permanent nerve damage or arthritis that develops as a result of the injury. 

Hip dislocation requires emergency care from an orthopedic expert. The Colorado Center of Orthopaedic Excellence in Colorado Springs cares for anybody in need of orthopedic care, from the victim of an auto accident to the world’s elite athletes. If you have an urgent orthopedic injury, call (719) 623-1050 today for an appointment.

The Different Types of Orthopedic Surgeons

The word “orthopedic” itself actually translates as the care of children. The prefix ortho- means straight, and the suffix -peds means child. Put the word together and it means to make a child straight. Therefore, orthopedic surgeons aim to and specialize in diagnosing and treating conditions and injuries of the musculoskeletal system, meaning whatever is compromising the muscles, bones, joints, ligaments, and connective tissue. The field of orthopedics contains various areas of specialty, as general orthopedic surgeons are educated and skilled at treating various parts of the body.

In other words, the field of orthopedics is a collaborative team and group effort. It takes a team of trained and highly-skilled surgeons of different specialties to help meet the different needs of people. Whether you suffer from arthritis, an athlete with a sports injury, sprain/strain or broken leg, or a child with scoliosis, there are a variety of orthopedic surgeons that you can choose from to treat your unique needs. The top types of surgeons within the orthopedic field include:

1.     Pediatric Orthopedic Surgeons: Believe it or not, orthopedic surgeons treat children. Parents may turn to an orthopedic surgeon if they have concerns over their child’s growth and development. Pediatric orthopedic surgeons deal with scoliosis, broken bones, and a variety of other conditions and injuries affecting the growth plates in a child’s bones. 

2.     Sports Medicine: Athletes and active people often find themselves prone to injuries. Orthopedic surgeons often specialize in sports medicine to help athletes and non-athletes maintain a healthy lifestyle, and treat those with sports-related injuries, helping them recover and rehabilitate, to be able to function and restore mobility, to get back to doing the things that they love in a timely manner.

3.     Trauma Surgeons: When a trauma occurs due to car accidents, violence, and other severe injuries, trauma surgeons work quickly to repair the damage such as broken bones and torn ligaments, in order to prevent long-term damage. These surgeons also help rehabilitate patients from injuries after surgery.

4.     Foot & Ankle: Some orthopedic surgeons specialize in treating injuries and conditions affecting the lower extremities, more specifically the feet and ankles. Since the ankles and feet have a complex composition of bones, ligaments, joints, etc., a foot and ankle specialist is able to have a more intimate knowledge about the anatomy and treatment of this area. 

To learn more about these types of surgeons and others within the field of orthopedics, call Colorado Center of Orthopaedic Excellence in Colorado Springs at (719) 623-1050, or request an appointment online.